Nuclear medicine

The tracer is usually injected into the bloodstream through the vein, but can also be administered nasally or orally.

The tracer makes the body slightly radioactive for a short time, allowing a nuclear medicine camera to detect radiation and to produce internal pictures. These images show a nuclear medicine technician or radiologist how the body is functioning.

How should I prepare for a nuclear medicine scan?

Generally, there is no preparation for a nuclear medicine scan, however, if your referring doctor has stipulated any requirements these will be discussed when you schedule your appointment.

Please advise our staff if you are pregnant, breastfeeding or taking any medications. Certain drugs could alter the test results, so you may need to stop taking them for a few days before your scan.

Please bring any relevant X-rays or scans to your appointment.

On the day of your appointment

Epworth Medical Imaging's friendly staff will greet you on arrival and take your referral form. A nuclear medicine technologist will then collect you from reception and take you to the nuclear medicine room. For most scans you will not be required to change into a gown.

A small injection of tracer will be administered (usually an injection into your arm). The tracer will circulate very quickly and will be absorbed by the organs or bones that are being examined.

Depending on the procedure, our nuclear medicine technician will explain what will happen next. You will be asked to lie on a bed and a gamma camera will be placed alongside your body near the organ of interest. The process will not be painful.

The timing of each examination depends on the test. For example, a thyroid gland will be scanned almost immediately after the injection, but you will be asked to return about three hours after the injection for a bone scan.

Results

After your examination please report to reception where you will be presented with hard copy films or a CD. The radiologist will produce a report that will be sent directly to your GP or specialist. Please contact your referring doctor to discuss your results.